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23 N. Coast Hwy
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News

The latest goings-on at the MidCoast Watersheds Council

Dump your hazardous waste for free August 12th in Lincoln County

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Lincoln County residents can properly dispose of highly-hazardous household waste for free during an annual event, sponsored by Lincoln County waste haulers and the County Solid Waste District. Bring your household hazardous waste to North Lincoln Sanitary’s facility at 1726 SE Highway 101, in Lincoln City. They’ll take your hazardous waste without charge from 10am through 3pm on Saturday August 12th.

Held once a year, in partnership with the Lincoln County Haulers, this event rotates between Lincoln City, Newport, Toledo and Waldport. Program Manager, Mark Saelens said “It is critical to do as much as we can to keep hazardous materials out of the environment and away from children and pets. Disposing of old, unused or excess hazardous material is very expensive and this event allows citizens to do their part for free.”

At this event the Household hazardous accepted will include:

• Poisons: pesticides, herbicides, fungicides & other poisons

• Heavy Metals: mercury & products containing elemental mercury

• Corrosives: acids, bases, & reactives

Using care when handling hazardous household waste is essential. The proper preparation and transport of hazardous materials will minimize risks to you, your family, property, and disposal staff from accidental spills or dangerous mixing of materials.

Products should not be mixed together. Dangerous reactions can occur when some materials are mixed. Keeping products in their original containers when possible will help staff dispose of materials safely. Products should also be properly sealed to prevent leaks and spills. If a container is leaking, secure it in a secondary leak-proof container. Pack containers in sturdy boxes in the trunk of your vehicle, away from the driver, passengers and pets.

Containers and boxes, including gasoline cans, cannot be returned, so make sure you don’t need them for future use. Please do not put items in plastic bags.

Household batteries, car batteries and fluorescent bulbs should not be brought to the event as these can be dropped off at recycling/transfer stations throughout the year during regular business hours. Oil based, latex and other paints (some of which are considered hazardous household waste) should not be brought to the event unless the paint cans have lost their label. Most latex and oil based paint can also be dropped off throughout the year. A few spray paint can that are at least a quarter full will be accepted.

CEGs, businesses and governments that have hazardous waste are asked to schedule an appointment to drop off their waste. Fees apply. Please contact Mark Saelens, Lincoln County Solid Waste District (msaelens@co.lincoln.or.us, 541-574-1285) in advance to schedule an appointment.

Monthly Meeting, August 2017

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Monitoring the effects of large wood on stream habitat and salmon populations

Thursday, August 3rd, 2017 6:30 PM

Newport Visual Arts Center

777 NW Beach Dr. Newport, OR 97365

Chris Lorion (right) works with a technician at the Mill Creek (Siletz) Life Cycle Monitoring site

Chris Lorion (right) works with a technician at the Mill Creek (Siletz) Life Cycle Monitoring site

“How many fish will this restoration project produce?” It is a question restoration professionals get asked all the time, and it is one that is very difficult to answer. However, we may be closer than ever to showing how restoration projects affect fish populations thanks to the Mill Creek (Siletz) restoration and effectiveness monitoring project.

The MidCoast Watersheds Council invites the public to attend a presentation by Chris Lorion, Assistant Project Leader for the Salmonid Life Cycle Monitoring Project with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), on Thursday August 3rd, 2017 at 6:30 PM in Newport.  The talk will be held in room 205 at the Newport Visual Arts Center at Nye Beach.  Refreshments will be served.

The Mill Creek Restoration and Effectiveness Monitoring project was funded by the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board. It is a collaboration between the MidCoast Watersheds Council, ODFW, Oregon State University, Oregon Dept. of Environmental Quality, Weyerhaeuser, Lincoln Soil and Water Conservation District and the Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Indians. The restoration work addressed the limiting factors of stream complexity and winter rearing habitat for coho in Mill Creek.  Over 700 large logs were placed in Mill Creek and its tributaries to capture gravel, aggrade the stream bed, create back eddies and provide protection for young fish.   The effectiveness monitoring part of the project builds on the past work of ODFW in this basin.  Mill Creek is one of seven Salmonid Life Cycle Monitoring (LCM) sites managed by ODFW on the central Oregon coast. These sites estimate abundance of salmonids and downstream migrating juvenile salmonids, estimate marine and freshwater survival rates for coho, and evaluate effects of habitat modification on the abundance of juvenile salmonids. Due to the existing monitoring history, there was the opportunity to evaluate effects of large wood placement on stream habitat and fish populations.

Chris Lorion has worked as the assistant project leader for ODFW for 9 years, coordinating the ODFW Salmonid Life Cycle Monitoring Project. . Before that, Chris earned a Bachelor’s degree in Fisheries Science from Oregon State University and a Doctorate in Natural Resources from the University of Idaho and the Tropical Agricultural Research and Higher Education Center in Costa Rica. Over the past 20 years, Chris has worked on fish research projects investigating a wide variety of species, ranging from lampreys and cutthroat trout in Oregon to cichlids and tetras in tropical streams.

Come learn more about the Mill Creek restoration project and ODFW’s Life Cycle Monitoring on August 3rd!

Large Woody Debris (LWD) placed in Mill Creek as a part of the restoration project and the effects on stream habitat and salmon populations will be monitored for years to come.

Large Woody Debris (LWD) placed in Mill Creek as a part of the restoration project and the effects on stream habitat and salmon populations will be monitored for years to come.

Coho on Tour- Beaver Creek with Paul Engelmeyer

MidCoast Watersheds Council

You are invited: Beaver Creek tour, led by Paul Engelmeyer

When: June 10, 2017 10am at the Beaver Creek boat launch parking area

Paul Engelmeyer, Chair of MCWC

Paul Engelmeyer, Chair of MCWC

Paul Engelmeyer, Chair of the MidCoast Watersheds Council and a representative of conservation group interests on the MCWC board of directors, will lead a field trip on behalf of the Native Fish Society.  MCWC participants are invited.

Paul will lead the June 10th field trip starting at Beaver Creek State Park. There Paul will talk about land-based conservation strategies, including conservation easements and landowner driven stewardship in coastal wetlands.

Attendees will learn about the value of alternate life history patterns and how fish hatcheries heavily impacted the diversity of coho salmon. From there participants will head up to the headwater tributaries to gain a vista of current land management issues, including logging and agricultural practices that affect water quality and quantity.

Multiple stops along the way will explain the benefits ofpartnershipsas well as in-stream restoration work completed by local communities in partnership with the Siuslaw National Forest.

On the way back, participants will see what is being done in Oregon's Yaquina estuary to restore juvenile salmon nursery habitats and discuss the planning that is taking place to ensure these habitats persist with sea-level rise.

Paul Engelmeyer, who has been working on coho recovery for over 25 years, will also discuss what still needs to be done to keep Oregon Coastal Coho on the path to broad sense recovery.

Please RSVP and for more information contact:

Paul Engelmeyer, pengelmeyer@peak.org

Juvenile coho, photo by Conrad Gowell

Juvenile coho, photo by Conrad Gowell

Monthly Meeting, June 2017

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Managing Forest Lands for Multiple Resources

Thursday June 1st, 2017 6:30 PMCentral Lincoln PUD

Matt Fehrenbacher, Trout Mountain Forestry

Matt Fehrenbacher, Trout Mountain Forestry

See the forest for more than the trees! Join us on June 1st for a presentation on management of Oregon’s coastal forests for multiple benefits.

The MidCoast Watersheds Council invites the public to attend a presentation by Matt Fehrenbacher of Trout Mountain Forestry on June 1st, 2017 at 6:30 PM in Newport.  The talk will be held at the public meeting room at the Central Lincoln PUD, across from the Safeway complex.  Refreshments will be served.

Matt’s presentation will focus on managing forest lands for multiple resources and Trout Mountain Forestry's approach to forest management for various owners including family lands, municipalities and lands owned by conservation organizations.  Matt will discuss the vanEck Forest, a 7,200 acre private forest located in Lincoln county that is managed under a working forest conservation easement.  The easement establishes restoration and maintenance of native forest structure as the primary ecological goal while continuing to generate revenue for the landowner.  Alternative silvicultural approaches such as selective harvest, various thinning regimes, and harvesting to retain trees of variable sizes are being used to encourage complex forest structure while maintaining the capacity for productive commercial forest management.

A native of the rural Willamette Valley, Matt Fehrenbacher has spent the last 20 years in the woods of the Pacific Northwest managing private forests for a broad range of objectives. As a forest engineer and silviculturist for a large industrial timber company in northwest Oregon he implemented some of the earliest salmon habitat restoration projects crafted under the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds. During his ten years as Director of Stewardship at Pacific Forest Trust he was instrumental in development and management of the first forest carbon market project registered under California’s Climate Action Reserve.  He also directed the  stewardship and forest management activities on 20,000 acres of forest conservation lands. Since joining Trout Mountain Forestry in 2011, Matt maintains a client base which includes family forests, non-profit conservation organizations and municipalities. Matt lives in Corvallis with his wife and two daughters.

Come learn more about sustainable forest resource management on June 1st!

People's March for Science Donates Proceeds to Lincoln County School Science Program

MidCoast Watersheds Council

mfors.jpg

 Last month, on Earth Day, 675 scientists and community members marched together in Newport to celebrate the importance of science in all our lives.

The march, and subsequent rally, would not have been possible without the support of the participants and the many individuals who contributed to the People’s March for Science.  The donations to the march, supported by the non-profit MidCoast Watersheds Council, were generous and plentiful. 

They covered the march’s costs and more; with $784 of net proceeds.  These funds have been passed on the Oregon Coast STEM Hub in Lincoln County.  The Science, Technology, Engineering and Math program supports students in schools throughout Lincoln County.

Stacia Fletcher, Director of the Oregon Coast STEM Hub, received the donation from the People's March for Science.  Fletcher said, "We're grateful for this donation. This will give us the ability to help Lincoln County students participate in activities such as robotics, renewable energy competitions, and engineering design challenges.”   

The MidCoast Watersheds Council and the march committee thanks everyone for their generosity. 

May 17th: Ocean Frontiers III Film Screening and Panel Discussion

MidCoast Watersheds Council

On May 17 at 5:00pm join us for a special evening at the Yachats Commons for a screening of Green Fire Productions newest film, Ocean Frontiers III: Leaders in Ocean Stewardship & the New Blue Economy. A truly unique and hopeful ocean film that chronicles our efforts to plan for a healthy, safe, and sustainable future, the film explores the intersection of national security, maritime commerce, fishing, and recreation, plus expanding industries such as offshore wind energy and aquaculture, coupled with scientific discovery. The film tells the story of how ocean planning helps us manage and balance all the uses of our ocean to keep it thriving for generations to come.

Ocean Frontiers III Film Screening and Panel Discussion

When: Wednesday, May 17 – Reception 5pm · Film 6pm · Q&A 7pm

Where: Yachats Commons, 441 Highway 101 N., Yachats, OR 97498

Free admission & refreshments

RSVP to save your seat: www.bit.ly/OF3Yachats

Watch the

Facebook Information: https://www.facebook.com/OceanFrontiers/

Participate in the post-film conversation about ocean planning on the West coast with filmmaker, Karen Meyer, Executive Director of Green Fire Productions and Charlie Plybon, Oregon Policy Manager of Surfrider Foundation.

This event is hosted by: Audubon Society of Portland -Ten Mile Creek Sanctuary, Surfrider Foundation, Oregon Shores Conservation Coalition, Midcoast Watersheds Council, and Green Fire Productions.

Event contact: Karen Anspacher-Meyer, Green Fire Productions, Karen@greenfireproductions.org  503-709-5467

Monthly Meeting, May 2017

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Conservation planning for three lampreys of coastal Oregon:  Western Brook Lamprey, Western River Lamprey, and Pacific Lamprey

 Thursday May 4th, 2017 6:30 PM  Central Lincoln PUD

Lamprey species first appear in the fossil record over 450 million years ago. Myth and legend follow these mysterious and secretive fish; you now have an opportunity to learn more and separate myth from reality.

The public is invited to a presentation by Ben Clemens at the MidCoast Watersheds Council meeting on Thursday May 4th, 2017 at 6:30pm, to learn about lamprey on the Oregon coast. The meeting will be held in the public meeting room at the Central Lincoln PUD building, located at 2129 N Coast Hwy in Newport, across from the Safeway complex.  Refreshments will be served.

Ben Clemens is the Statewide Lamprey Coordinator with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. Ben earned his Bachelor’s degree in Biology from Central Michigan University, Master’s degree in Zoology from the University of Guelph, and Doctorate in Fisheries from Oregon State University. Since 2004, Ben has worked on projects related to juvenile Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River estuary, lamprey biology, and led ODFW’s fish ageing laboratory. In his new role as Statewide Lamprey Coordinator, Ben is working on conservation plans for Oregon lampreys, liaising with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on their Pacific Lamprey Conservation Initiative, and is identifying areas needing research, monitoring, and evaluation to help fill information gaps critical to informing conservation planning and actions for Oregon lampreys.

Come learn more about the mysterious lamprey on May 4th!

Monthly Meeting, April 2017

MidCoast Watersheds Council

An Intimate Look at Peregrine Falcon Nesting

Thursday, April 6th, 2017

NEWPORT VISUAL ARTS CENTER

777 NW Beach Dr. Newport, OR

Wayne Hoffman, Policy Director for the MCWC, aims his camera at a Peregrine Falcon nest at Yaquina Head.

Wayne Hoffman, Policy Director for the MCWC, aims his camera at a Peregrine Falcon nest at Yaquina Head.

PLEASE NOTE THE VENUE CHANGE FOR THIS MONTH

Spring is in the air and you may have noticed the local birds have starting singing in preparation for another nesting season. The public is invited to a presentation by Wayne Hoffman at the MidCoast Watersheds Council meeting on Thursday April 6th, 2017 at 6:30pm, to learn about recent peregrine falcon nesting at Yaquina Head. The meeting will be held in room 205 at the Newport Visual Arts Center, located at 777 NW Beach Dr. in Newport. Refreshments will be served.

Wayne Hoffman is a native Oregonian who graduated from Newport High School in 1969, then obtained Bachelor's and Master's degrees in Zoology from Oregon State University, and a Ph. D in Biology from the University of South Florida.  After a Postdoc with the Kansas Biological Survey he worked for 11 years for the National Audubon Society, conducting research on bird populations and habitat needs.  He then returned to Newport, and has worked for the MidCoast Watersheds Council since 1999, currently as Policy Director. 

A pair of Peregrine Falcons began nesting at Yaquina Head in 2012.  This is the most accessible site in a naturalistic setting for observation and photography in the western United States.  Wayne and other local photographers and birders have been documenting these birds ever since.  Wayne will describe the Peregrine nesting cycle, from courtship to fledgling independence, including incubation, chick feeding behavior, prey selection, and nest defense. He will also illustrate social dynamics, including infidelity, mate replacement, and responses to visitors.

We hope you can join us on April 6th.  

Monthly Meeting, March 2017

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Can we save an estuary ecosystem engineer, the blue mud shrimp, from going extinct?

THURSDAY March 2ND @ 6:30PM

Central Lincoln Peoples Utility District

2129 N Coast Hwy, Newport, OR 97365

Blue mud shrimp, photo courtesy of Biodiversity of Central Coast (BC), Teegan Bennington

Blue mud shrimp, photo courtesy of Biodiversity of Central Coast (BC), Teegan Bennington

The public is invited to a presentation by John Chapman at the MidCoast Watersheds Council meeting on Thursday March 2nd, 2017 at 6:30 pm in Newport, to learn about the threats to native mud shrimp, the original ecosystem engineer of Oregon estuaries. The meeting will be held in the public meeting room at the Central Lincoln PUD building, located at 2129 N Coast Hwy in Newport, across from the Safeway complex.  Refreshments will be served.

The native blue mud shrimp has been declining to effective or actual extinction over its range between British Columbia and Morro Bay, California. The decline has been due to an introduced Asian isopod parasite that arrived in the mid-1980s without any of its native Asian hosts. The blue mud shrimp has been the only final host for the parasite in Oregon, leaving it without an alternative host to maintain its populations where blue mud shrimp extinctions occur. However, recent invasions of a co-evolved host species from Asia have added an alternative host as the native mud shrimp have disappeared. In the end, the loss of this native mud shrimp will be as significant to the estuaries as diking or the depletion of marshes and mudflats.

John Chapman’s research concerns are the ecology and natural history of introduced marine organisms in nearshore oceans and estuaries, marine tsunami debris, the collapse of native burrowing mud shrimp in the eastern Pacific and the population biology of western gray whale prey species on the Sakhalin Island shelf of Russia. John also teaches “Aquatic Biological Invasions” through the Oregon State University departments of Fisheries and Wildlife and Integrative Biology.

We hope you can join us on March 2nd.  

John Chapman, OSU Fisheries and Wildlife

John Chapman, OSU Fisheries and Wildlife

Monthly Meeting, February 2017

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Salmon and Floodplains: The National Flood Insurance Program and the Endangered Species Act

THURSDAY February 2nd @ 6:30PM

Central Lincoln Peoples Utility District

2129 N Coast Hwy, Newport, OR 97365

Matt Spangler

Matt Spangler

This time of year we always seem to be in a flood warning or looking at flooding coming soon. When rivers and creeks spill over their banks people think first about property and possessions, but these floodplains are also important for salmon.

The public is invited to a presentation by Matt Spangler at the MidCoast Watersheds Council meeting on Thursday February 2nd, 2017 at 6:30 pm in Newport, to learn about the National Flood Insurance program and the Endangered Species Act. The meeting will be held in the public meeting room at the Central Lincoln PUD building, located at 2129 N Coast Hwy in Newport, across from the Safeway complex.  Refreshments will be served.

Matt Spangler is the Senior Coastal Policy Analyst for the Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD). Prior to joining DLCD in 2009, he worked for many years as a local government land use planner on the coast, including more than 20 years as the Planning and Development Director for Lincoln County. Matt is a graduate of Whitman College, where he completed a degree in Environmental Studies and Sociology.

Matt’s presentation will provide a summary of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) recent Endangered Species Act Biological Opinion (BiOp) on the National Flood Insurance Program in Oregon.  It will cover the background on the process leading up to the BiOp, how implementation of the recommendations in the BiOp may affect development and management of floodplains in Oregon communities, and the possible implications for salmon recovery. 

We hope you can join us on February 2nd. 

A common sight this time of year: local creeks spilling over their banks and into floodplains

A common sight this time of year: local creeks spilling over their banks and into floodplains

Monthly Meeting, January 2017

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Newport Surfrider Foundation and the Blue Water Task Force

THURSDAY January 5th @ 6:30PM

Central Lincoln Peoples Utility District

2129 N Coast Hwy, Newport, OR 97365

Vince Pappalardo testing water quality on the beach near Newport.

Vince Pappalardo testing water quality on the beach near Newport.

Do you like to roll up your pants and hike the beach?  It’s best to know if there are any water quality issues at your favorite spots – here is a project that will help you understand the health of our beaches and nearshore waters.

The public is invited to a presentation by Vince Pappalardo at the MidCoast Watersheds Council meeting on Thursday January 5th, 2017 at 6:30 pm in Newport, to learn about the Newport chapter of the Surfrider Foundation and their Blue Water Task Force. The meeting will be held in the public meeting room at the Central Lincoln PUD building, located at 2129 N Coast Hwy in Newport, across from the Safeway complex.  Refreshments will be served.

Vince Pappalardo holds a Bachelor’s of Science in Mechanical Engineering from San Jose State University and has been a professional Mechanical Engineer for the last 29 years. However, his passion is surfing and he has a deep love of the ocean. To support his passion, Vince has been an active member of the Newport Surfrider Chapter for the last 10 years. In that time, he has served as the Beach Cleanup Coordinator, Blue Water Task Force Coordinator and now holds the position of Volunteer Coordinator.

Vince’s presentation will focus on the work done by the Newport Surfrider Foundation testing local water quality, cleaning up beaches and shaping local marine policy.  There will be an emphasis on the water quality testing work in terms of what is tested, where tests are done, and the current state of water quality at the 5 to 10 sites tested weekly.

Come learn more about the water quality at your favorite beach spots!

Come learn more about the water quality at your favorite beach spots!

We hope you can join us on January 5th.  

Monthly Meeting, December 2016

MidCoast Watersheds Council

THURSDAY December 1st @ 6:30PM

Central Lincoln Peoples Utility District

2129 N Coast Hwy, Newport, OR 97365

MCWC Vice-Chair: Rennie Ferris

MCWC Vice-Chair: Rennie Ferris

The public is invited to a workshop by Rennie Ferris at the MidCoast Watersheds Council meeting on Thursday December 1st, 2016 at 6:30 pm in Newport, to learn about pruning shore pines on the Oregon Coast. The meeting will be held in the public meeting room at the Central Lincoln PUD building, located at 2129 N Coast Hwy in Newport, across from the Safeway complex.  Refreshments will be served.

Rennie Ferris is the vice-chair of the MidCoast Watersheds Council. He has spent his life working in the nursery and landscape business here in Newport. He started working in local nurseries at age nine, and from 1975 to his retirement in 2010 his work focused on coastal landscaping. His lifelong interest in growing and caring for trees on the coast has included leading plant pruning workshops with the Lincoln County Extension Service for 12 years. He wants to share this expertise with all of you, so everyone can have beautiful, healthy and nicely sculpted tree specimens in their yards.

We hope you can join us on December 1st for this fun, interactive workshop. 

Shore Pine (Pinus contorta) along the Oregon Coast. Photo: G.D. Carr

Shore Pine (Pinus contorta) along the Oregon Coast. Photo: G.D. Carr

Monthly Meeting, November 2016

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Fish and Wildlife in Oregon’s Nearshore Ocean

THURSDAY November 3rd @ 6:30PM

Central Lincoln Peoples Utility District

2129 N Coast Hwy, Newport, OR 97365

Greg Krutzikowsky, ODFW

Greg Krutzikowsky, ODFW

The public is invited to a talk by Greg Krutzikowsky at the MidCoast Watersheds Council meeting on Thursday November 3rd, 2016 at 6:30 pm in Newport, to hear about a new resource for learning about the fish and wildlife in our nearshore waters. The meeting will be held in the public meeting room at the Central Lincoln PUD building, located at 2129 N Coast Hwy in Newport, across from the Safeway complex.  Refreshments will be served.

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife recently updated both the Oregon Conservation Strategy and the Oregon Nearshore Strategy, that focuses on species dependent on the marine environment. Now these in-depth resources are available to the public in an online interactive format.  

The new online tool is designed to engage Oregonians in conservation of our fish, wildlife and their habitats. This site brings 300 pages of text to life with pictures, videos, and interactive features to search for topics of interest about Oregon’s fish and wildlife species, their habitats, and many of the conservation issues they face. Greg’s presentation will introduce the new website with a focus on the Oregon Nearshore Strategy.

Greg Krutzikowsky earned a Bachelor’s degree in marine biology and a Master’s degree in oceanography. He has worked as an educator, research scientist, boat captain, and fishery manager. His work has taken him to many parts of the North and South Pacific, the North Atlantic and the Arctic oceans. Greg works at the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife currently, where his work focuses on the conservation and sustainable use of Oregon’s living marine resources and their habitats.

We hope you can join us on November 3rd.

Video Lander equipment being retrieved after investigating species and habitats on rocky reefs off Newport. 

Video Lander equipment being retrieved after investigating species and habitats on rocky reefs off Newport. 

Tenmile Creek: A Restoration Story October 7, Cape Perpetua

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Yachats, OR – Chris Lorion, fisheries biologist with Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, will present results from a long-term fish population and stream habitat monitoring project on Friday, Oct 7, at 4:00pm at the Cape Perpetua Visitor Center. He will be discussing trends in salmon and steelhead populations in Tenmile Creek over the past 25 years and how they were affected by a large restoration project in 1996.

The Tenmile Creek watershed encompasses approximately 15,000 acres on the central Oregon Coast. The watershed is unique in its location, placed between the Cummins and Rock Creek wilderness areas. Steelhead and cutthroat trout, coho and chinook salmon, pacific lamprey, eulachon (smelt), and four species of cottids are known to live in the Tenmile basin.
In the early 1990s, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the local community, and the Siuslaw National Forest developed a partnership that grew into a basin-wide protection and restoration program, which eventually led to a national award in 2005. The 1996 restoration project included not only helicopter placement of a large amount of wood in Tenmile Creek, but land acquisition, road decommissioning, and riparian restoration. Chris will talk about how wood abundance has changed over time and what this means for fish habitat and steelhead and coho populations in the basin.


Chris Lorion is the Assistant Project Leader for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Salmonid Life Cycle Monitoring Project.


The Siuslaw National Forest manages more than 630,000 acres of temperate rainforests along the Oregon Coast Range, from Tillamook to the end of the Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area in Coos Bay. Additional information is available online at www.fs.usda.gov/siuslaw, www.twitter.com/SiuslawNF and www.facebook.com/DiscoverSiuslawNF.

For more information:

Lisa Romano, lmromano@fs.fed.us, 541-750-7075
Brian Hoeh, bbhoeh@fs.fed.us, 541-547-3289

Monthly Meeting October 2016

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Forested and spruce swamp restoration on the Oregon Coast

Thursday October 6th @ 6:30pm

Central Lincoln Peoples Utility District

2129 N Coast Hwy, Newport, OR 97365

Jake Robinson, Yankee Creek Forestry

Jake Robinson, Yankee Creek Forestry

The public is invited to a talk by Jake Robinson to learn about forested wetland and spruce swamp restoration at the MidCoast Watersheds Council meeting on Thursday October 6th, 2016 at 6:30 pm in Newport. The meeting will be held in the public meeting room at the Central Lincoln PUD building, located at 2129 N Coast Hwy in Newport, across from the Safeway complex. Refreshments will be served.

Estuaries and wetlands along the Oregon coast have been altered during the past 150 years by diking, draining and conversion to agriculture or development. Over 90% of tidal marshes and swamps have been lost in the process. These areas are vital habitat for countless species and also dampen flood and storm effects, trap sediment, sequester carbon and provide nutrients to lower estuaries and the ocean.

Jake Robinson of Yankee Creek Forestry has been practicing forestry since 2001. His work has involved everything from cruising to cutting, planning to planting. In addition to working as a private contractor serving small, non-industrial private forest landowners, he has also worked with a variety of agencies and NGO’s including South Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Northwest Natural Resource Group, U.S. Forest Service, Oregon Department of Forestry, Natural Resource Conservation Service, Lomakatsi Restoration Project and several watershed councils.

Jake’s presentation will focus on an innovative use of forest byproducts in an ecological restoration project, and combining upland forest work with wetland restoration.

We hope you can join us on October 6th. 

Cape Perpetua BioBlitz: Lichen Survey

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Join partners from Oregon State Parks, the Audubon Society of Portland, Oregon Marine Reserves Partnership and the U.S. Forest Service in exploring the depths of the Cape Perpetua forest landscape. Participants will work along side Forest Service staff and lead Botanists in an effort to catalogue the many and varied species of Lichen in the region.

WHEN & WHERE:
[10am—4pm] Thursday September 22th
The Cape Perpetua Visitor Center is located 3 miles south of Yachats Oregon. Participants are to meet at the Visitor Center for registraion and a short briefing before groups depart.
A day use fee of $5 is required for parking within the Cape Perpetua Area.
Bring your waterproof shoes, raincoat, binocu-lars, water and snacks. Water proof cameras and/or cell phone cases are also encouraged.

For more information, contact:
Brian Hoeh
Cape Perpetua Director
Forest Service
541-547-3289
bbhoeh@fs.fed.us

Monthly Meeting September 2016

MidCoast Watersheds Council

What will it really take to restore coho on the coast?

Thursday September 1st @ 6:30pm

Central Lincoln Peoples Utility District

2129 N Coast Hwy, Newport, OR 97365

 

Charley Dewberry

Charley Dewberry

The public is invited to a talk by Charley Dewberry at the MidCoast Watersheds Council meeting on Thursday September 1st, 2016 at 6:30 pm in Newport, to gain a historical perspective on coho restoration. The meeting will be held in the public meeting room at the Central Lincoln PUD building, located at 2129 N Coast Hwy in Newport, across from the Safeway complex.  Refreshments will be served.

Imagine the days when hundreds of thousands of salmon ran up each of our major rivers to spawn and multiple canning plants lined the lower Alsea, Yaquina and Siletz rivers. This was all without hatchery production, depending on the natural productivity of healthy rivers and ecosystem.  In his talk, Charley will provide background on the history of salmon runs in our area. He will also discuss how “shifting baselines” make measuring successful restoration more challenging. 

Charley Dewberry is one of the most experienced field workers in the Pacific Northwest. He has spent the last 30 years snorkel diving and counting juvenile salmonids as the basis for constructing restoration plans. He worked for 10 years for Jim Sedell at the U.S. Forest Service Regional Lab in Corvallis. He has also worked for Pacific Rivers, Ecotrust, and several timber companies. In 2005, Charley was part of the Siuslaw partnership that won the international Theiss River Prize for the outstanding river restoration. In 2016, he was selected as the River Restorationist of the year by the Society of Ecological Restoration, Northwest. 

We hope you can join us on September 1st.