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23 N. Coast Hwy
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News

The latest goings-on at the MidCoast Watersheds Council

Monthly Meeting, May 2017

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Conservation planning for three lampreys of coastal Oregon:  Western Brook Lamprey, Western River Lamprey, and Pacific Lamprey

 Thursday May 4th, 2017 6:30 PM  Central Lincoln PUD

Lamprey species first appear in the fossil record over 450 million years ago. Myth and legend follow these mysterious and secretive fish; you now have an opportunity to learn more and separate myth from reality.

The public is invited to a presentation by Ben Clemens at the MidCoast Watersheds Council meeting on Thursday May 4th, 2017 at 6:30pm, to learn about lamprey on the Oregon coast. The meeting will be held in the public meeting room at the Central Lincoln PUD building, located at 2129 N Coast Hwy in Newport, across from the Safeway complex.  Refreshments will be served.

Ben Clemens is the Statewide Lamprey Coordinator with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. Ben earned his Bachelor’s degree in Biology from Central Michigan University, Master’s degree in Zoology from the University of Guelph, and Doctorate in Fisheries from Oregon State University. Since 2004, Ben has worked on projects related to juvenile Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River estuary, lamprey biology, and led ODFW’s fish ageing laboratory. In his new role as Statewide Lamprey Coordinator, Ben is working on conservation plans for Oregon lampreys, liaising with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on their Pacific Lamprey Conservation Initiative, and is identifying areas needing research, monitoring, and evaluation to help fill information gaps critical to informing conservation planning and actions for Oregon lampreys.

Come learn more about the mysterious lamprey on May 4th!

Monthly Meeting, April 2017

MidCoast Watersheds Council

An Intimate Look at Peregrine Falcon Nesting

Thursday, April 6th, 2017

NEWPORT VISUAL ARTS CENTER

777 NW Beach Dr. Newport, OR

Wayne Hoffman, Policy Director for the MCWC, aims his camera at a Peregrine Falcon nest at Yaquina Head.

Wayne Hoffman, Policy Director for the MCWC, aims his camera at a Peregrine Falcon nest at Yaquina Head.

PLEASE NOTE THE VENUE CHANGE FOR THIS MONTH

Spring is in the air and you may have noticed the local birds have starting singing in preparation for another nesting season. The public is invited to a presentation by Wayne Hoffman at the MidCoast Watersheds Council meeting on Thursday April 6th, 2017 at 6:30pm, to learn about recent peregrine falcon nesting at Yaquina Head. The meeting will be held in room 205 at the Newport Visual Arts Center, located at 777 NW Beach Dr. in Newport. Refreshments will be served.

Wayne Hoffman is a native Oregonian who graduated from Newport High School in 1969, then obtained Bachelor's and Master's degrees in Zoology from Oregon State University, and a Ph. D in Biology from the University of South Florida.  After a Postdoc with the Kansas Biological Survey he worked for 11 years for the National Audubon Society, conducting research on bird populations and habitat needs.  He then returned to Newport, and has worked for the MidCoast Watersheds Council since 1999, currently as Policy Director. 

A pair of Peregrine Falcons began nesting at Yaquina Head in 2012.  This is the most accessible site in a naturalistic setting for observation and photography in the western United States.  Wayne and other local photographers and birders have been documenting these birds ever since.  Wayne will describe the Peregrine nesting cycle, from courtship to fledgling independence, including incubation, chick feeding behavior, prey selection, and nest defense. He will also illustrate social dynamics, including infidelity, mate replacement, and responses to visitors.

We hope you can join us on April 6th.  

Monthly Meeting, March 2017

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Can we save an estuary ecosystem engineer, the blue mud shrimp, from going extinct?

THURSDAY March 2ND @ 6:30PM

Central Lincoln Peoples Utility District

2129 N Coast Hwy, Newport, OR 97365

Blue mud shrimp, photo courtesy of Biodiversity of Central Coast (BC), Teegan Bennington

Blue mud shrimp, photo courtesy of Biodiversity of Central Coast (BC), Teegan Bennington

The public is invited to a presentation by John Chapman at the MidCoast Watersheds Council meeting on Thursday March 2nd, 2017 at 6:30 pm in Newport, to learn about the threats to native mud shrimp, the original ecosystem engineer of Oregon estuaries. The meeting will be held in the public meeting room at the Central Lincoln PUD building, located at 2129 N Coast Hwy in Newport, across from the Safeway complex.  Refreshments will be served.

The native blue mud shrimp has been declining to effective or actual extinction over its range between British Columbia and Morro Bay, California. The decline has been due to an introduced Asian isopod parasite that arrived in the mid-1980s without any of its native Asian hosts. The blue mud shrimp has been the only final host for the parasite in Oregon, leaving it without an alternative host to maintain its populations where blue mud shrimp extinctions occur. However, recent invasions of a co-evolved host species from Asia have added an alternative host as the native mud shrimp have disappeared. In the end, the loss of this native mud shrimp will be as significant to the estuaries as diking or the depletion of marshes and mudflats.

John Chapman’s research concerns are the ecology and natural history of introduced marine organisms in nearshore oceans and estuaries, marine tsunami debris, the collapse of native burrowing mud shrimp in the eastern Pacific and the population biology of western gray whale prey species on the Sakhalin Island shelf of Russia. John also teaches “Aquatic Biological Invasions” through the Oregon State University departments of Fisheries and Wildlife and Integrative Biology.

We hope you can join us on March 2nd.  

John Chapman, OSU Fisheries and Wildlife

John Chapman, OSU Fisheries and Wildlife

Monthly Meeting, February 2017

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Salmon and Floodplains: The National Flood Insurance Program and the Endangered Species Act

THURSDAY February 2nd @ 6:30PM

Central Lincoln Peoples Utility District

2129 N Coast Hwy, Newport, OR 97365

Matt Spangler

Matt Spangler

This time of year we always seem to be in a flood warning or looking at flooding coming soon. When rivers and creeks spill over their banks people think first about property and possessions, but these floodplains are also important for salmon.

The public is invited to a presentation by Matt Spangler at the MidCoast Watersheds Council meeting on Thursday February 2nd, 2017 at 6:30 pm in Newport, to learn about the National Flood Insurance program and the Endangered Species Act. The meeting will be held in the public meeting room at the Central Lincoln PUD building, located at 2129 N Coast Hwy in Newport, across from the Safeway complex.  Refreshments will be served.

Matt Spangler is the Senior Coastal Policy Analyst for the Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD). Prior to joining DLCD in 2009, he worked for many years as a local government land use planner on the coast, including more than 20 years as the Planning and Development Director for Lincoln County. Matt is a graduate of Whitman College, where he completed a degree in Environmental Studies and Sociology.

Matt’s presentation will provide a summary of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) recent Endangered Species Act Biological Opinion (BiOp) on the National Flood Insurance Program in Oregon.  It will cover the background on the process leading up to the BiOp, how implementation of the recommendations in the BiOp may affect development and management of floodplains in Oregon communities, and the possible implications for salmon recovery. 

We hope you can join us on February 2nd. 

A common sight this time of year: local creeks spilling over their banks and into floodplains

A common sight this time of year: local creeks spilling over their banks and into floodplains

Monthly Meeting, January 2017

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Newport Surfrider Foundation and the Blue Water Task Force

THURSDAY January 5th @ 6:30PM

Central Lincoln Peoples Utility District

2129 N Coast Hwy, Newport, OR 97365

Vince Pappalardo testing water quality on the beach near Newport.

Vince Pappalardo testing water quality on the beach near Newport.

Do you like to roll up your pants and hike the beach?  It’s best to know if there are any water quality issues at your favorite spots – here is a project that will help you understand the health of our beaches and nearshore waters.

The public is invited to a presentation by Vince Pappalardo at the MidCoast Watersheds Council meeting on Thursday January 5th, 2017 at 6:30 pm in Newport, to learn about the Newport chapter of the Surfrider Foundation and their Blue Water Task Force. The meeting will be held in the public meeting room at the Central Lincoln PUD building, located at 2129 N Coast Hwy in Newport, across from the Safeway complex.  Refreshments will be served.

Vince Pappalardo holds a Bachelor’s of Science in Mechanical Engineering from San Jose State University and has been a professional Mechanical Engineer for the last 29 years. However, his passion is surfing and he has a deep love of the ocean. To support his passion, Vince has been an active member of the Newport Surfrider Chapter for the last 10 years. In that time, he has served as the Beach Cleanup Coordinator, Blue Water Task Force Coordinator and now holds the position of Volunteer Coordinator.

Vince’s presentation will focus on the work done by the Newport Surfrider Foundation testing local water quality, cleaning up beaches and shaping local marine policy.  There will be an emphasis on the water quality testing work in terms of what is tested, where tests are done, and the current state of water quality at the 5 to 10 sites tested weekly.

Come learn more about the water quality at your favorite beach spots!

Come learn more about the water quality at your favorite beach spots!

We hope you can join us on January 5th.  

Monthly Meeting, December 2016

MidCoast Watersheds Council

THURSDAY December 1st @ 6:30PM

Central Lincoln Peoples Utility District

2129 N Coast Hwy, Newport, OR 97365

MCWC Vice-Chair: Rennie Ferris

MCWC Vice-Chair: Rennie Ferris

The public is invited to a workshop by Rennie Ferris at the MidCoast Watersheds Council meeting on Thursday December 1st, 2016 at 6:30 pm in Newport, to learn about pruning shore pines on the Oregon Coast. The meeting will be held in the public meeting room at the Central Lincoln PUD building, located at 2129 N Coast Hwy in Newport, across from the Safeway complex.  Refreshments will be served.

Rennie Ferris is the vice-chair of the MidCoast Watersheds Council. He has spent his life working in the nursery and landscape business here in Newport. He started working in local nurseries at age nine, and from 1975 to his retirement in 2010 his work focused on coastal landscaping. His lifelong interest in growing and caring for trees on the coast has included leading plant pruning workshops with the Lincoln County Extension Service for 12 years. He wants to share this expertise with all of you, so everyone can have beautiful, healthy and nicely sculpted tree specimens in their yards.

We hope you can join us on December 1st for this fun, interactive workshop. 

Shore Pine (Pinus contorta) along the Oregon Coast. Photo: G.D. Carr

Shore Pine (Pinus contorta) along the Oregon Coast. Photo: G.D. Carr

Monthly Meeting, November 2016

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Fish and Wildlife in Oregon’s Nearshore Ocean

THURSDAY November 3rd @ 6:30PM

Central Lincoln Peoples Utility District

2129 N Coast Hwy, Newport, OR 97365

Greg Krutzikowsky, ODFW

Greg Krutzikowsky, ODFW

The public is invited to a talk by Greg Krutzikowsky at the MidCoast Watersheds Council meeting on Thursday November 3rd, 2016 at 6:30 pm in Newport, to hear about a new resource for learning about the fish and wildlife in our nearshore waters. The meeting will be held in the public meeting room at the Central Lincoln PUD building, located at 2129 N Coast Hwy in Newport, across from the Safeway complex.  Refreshments will be served.

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife recently updated both the Oregon Conservation Strategy and the Oregon Nearshore Strategy, that focuses on species dependent on the marine environment. Now these in-depth resources are available to the public in an online interactive format.  

The new online tool is designed to engage Oregonians in conservation of our fish, wildlife and their habitats. This site brings 300 pages of text to life with pictures, videos, and interactive features to search for topics of interest about Oregon’s fish and wildlife species, their habitats, and many of the conservation issues they face. Greg’s presentation will introduce the new website with a focus on the Oregon Nearshore Strategy.

Greg Krutzikowsky earned a Bachelor’s degree in marine biology and a Master’s degree in oceanography. He has worked as an educator, research scientist, boat captain, and fishery manager. His work has taken him to many parts of the North and South Pacific, the North Atlantic and the Arctic oceans. Greg works at the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife currently, where his work focuses on the conservation and sustainable use of Oregon’s living marine resources and their habitats.

We hope you can join us on November 3rd.

Video Lander equipment being retrieved after investigating species and habitats on rocky reefs off Newport. 

Video Lander equipment being retrieved after investigating species and habitats on rocky reefs off Newport. 

Tenmile Creek: A Restoration Story October 7, Cape Perpetua

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Yachats, OR – Chris Lorion, fisheries biologist with Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, will present results from a long-term fish population and stream habitat monitoring project on Friday, Oct 7, at 4:00pm at the Cape Perpetua Visitor Center. He will be discussing trends in salmon and steelhead populations in Tenmile Creek over the past 25 years and how they were affected by a large restoration project in 1996.

The Tenmile Creek watershed encompasses approximately 15,000 acres on the central Oregon Coast. The watershed is unique in its location, placed between the Cummins and Rock Creek wilderness areas. Steelhead and cutthroat trout, coho and chinook salmon, pacific lamprey, eulachon (smelt), and four species of cottids are known to live in the Tenmile basin.
In the early 1990s, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the local community, and the Siuslaw National Forest developed a partnership that grew into a basin-wide protection and restoration program, which eventually led to a national award in 2005. The 1996 restoration project included not only helicopter placement of a large amount of wood in Tenmile Creek, but land acquisition, road decommissioning, and riparian restoration. Chris will talk about how wood abundance has changed over time and what this means for fish habitat and steelhead and coho populations in the basin.


Chris Lorion is the Assistant Project Leader for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Salmonid Life Cycle Monitoring Project.


The Siuslaw National Forest manages more than 630,000 acres of temperate rainforests along the Oregon Coast Range, from Tillamook to the end of the Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area in Coos Bay. Additional information is available online at www.fs.usda.gov/siuslaw, www.twitter.com/SiuslawNF and www.facebook.com/DiscoverSiuslawNF.

For more information:

Lisa Romano, lmromano@fs.fed.us, 541-750-7075
Brian Hoeh, bbhoeh@fs.fed.us, 541-547-3289

Monthly Meeting October 2016

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Forested and spruce swamp restoration on the Oregon Coast

Thursday October 6th @ 6:30pm

Central Lincoln Peoples Utility District

2129 N Coast Hwy, Newport, OR 97365

Jake Robinson, Yankee Creek Forestry

Jake Robinson, Yankee Creek Forestry

The public is invited to a talk by Jake Robinson to learn about forested wetland and spruce swamp restoration at the MidCoast Watersheds Council meeting on Thursday October 6th, 2016 at 6:30 pm in Newport. The meeting will be held in the public meeting room at the Central Lincoln PUD building, located at 2129 N Coast Hwy in Newport, across from the Safeway complex. Refreshments will be served.

Estuaries and wetlands along the Oregon coast have been altered during the past 150 years by diking, draining and conversion to agriculture or development. Over 90% of tidal marshes and swamps have been lost in the process. These areas are vital habitat for countless species and also dampen flood and storm effects, trap sediment, sequester carbon and provide nutrients to lower estuaries and the ocean.

Jake Robinson of Yankee Creek Forestry has been practicing forestry since 2001. His work has involved everything from cruising to cutting, planning to planting. In addition to working as a private contractor serving small, non-industrial private forest landowners, he has also worked with a variety of agencies and NGO’s including South Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Northwest Natural Resource Group, U.S. Forest Service, Oregon Department of Forestry, Natural Resource Conservation Service, Lomakatsi Restoration Project and several watershed councils.

Jake’s presentation will focus on an innovative use of forest byproducts in an ecological restoration project, and combining upland forest work with wetland restoration.

We hope you can join us on October 6th. 

Cape Perpetua BioBlitz: Lichen Survey

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Join partners from Oregon State Parks, the Audubon Society of Portland, Oregon Marine Reserves Partnership and the U.S. Forest Service in exploring the depths of the Cape Perpetua forest landscape. Participants will work along side Forest Service staff and lead Botanists in an effort to catalogue the many and varied species of Lichen in the region.

WHEN & WHERE:
[10am—4pm] Thursday September 22th
The Cape Perpetua Visitor Center is located 3 miles south of Yachats Oregon. Participants are to meet at the Visitor Center for registraion and a short briefing before groups depart.
A day use fee of $5 is required for parking within the Cape Perpetua Area.
Bring your waterproof shoes, raincoat, binocu-lars, water and snacks. Water proof cameras and/or cell phone cases are also encouraged.

For more information, contact:
Brian Hoeh
Cape Perpetua Director
Forest Service
541-547-3289
bbhoeh@fs.fed.us

Monthly Meeting September 2016

MidCoast Watersheds Council

What will it really take to restore coho on the coast?

Thursday September 1st @ 6:30pm

Central Lincoln Peoples Utility District

2129 N Coast Hwy, Newport, OR 97365

 

Charley Dewberry

Charley Dewberry

The public is invited to a talk by Charley Dewberry at the MidCoast Watersheds Council meeting on Thursday September 1st, 2016 at 6:30 pm in Newport, to gain a historical perspective on coho restoration. The meeting will be held in the public meeting room at the Central Lincoln PUD building, located at 2129 N Coast Hwy in Newport, across from the Safeway complex.  Refreshments will be served.

Imagine the days when hundreds of thousands of salmon ran up each of our major rivers to spawn and multiple canning plants lined the lower Alsea, Yaquina and Siletz rivers. This was all without hatchery production, depending on the natural productivity of healthy rivers and ecosystem.  In his talk, Charley will provide background on the history of salmon runs in our area. He will also discuss how “shifting baselines” make measuring successful restoration more challenging. 

Charley Dewberry is one of the most experienced field workers in the Pacific Northwest. He has spent the last 30 years snorkel diving and counting juvenile salmonids as the basis for constructing restoration plans. He worked for 10 years for Jim Sedell at the U.S. Forest Service Regional Lab in Corvallis. He has also worked for Pacific Rivers, Ecotrust, and several timber companies. In 2005, Charley was part of the Siuslaw partnership that won the international Theiss River Prize for the outstanding river restoration. In 2016, he was selected as the River Restorationist of the year by the Society of Ecological Restoration, Northwest. 

We hope you can join us on September 1st. 

Cape Perpetua BioBlitz: Aquatic Corridor Survey

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Join partners from Oregon State Parks, The Audobon Society of Portland, the Native Fish Society and the US Forest Service in exploring the nooks and crannies of the creeks and seeps in the Cape Perpetua to Heceta Head landscape unit. Participants will hike along coastal tributaries in an effort to discover and catalog riparian and aquatic species of the region.

If you would like to participate please RSVP to Paul Engelmeyer, Manager of Audubon's 10 Mile Sanctuary and Chair of the MIdCoast Watersheds Council: pengelmeyer@peak.org or Ian Throckmorton, CPBB Coordinator  (503) 724-6202 (CPbioblitz@gmail.com).

For more information, click the button above.

Monthly Meeting August 2016

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Protecting water flows in streams for fish

Thursday August 4th @ 6:30pm

Central Lincoln Peoples Utility District

2129 N Coast Hwy, Newport, OR 97365

The public is invited to a talk by Lisa Brown at the MidCoast Watersheds Council meeting on Thursday August 4th, 2016 at 6:30 pm in Newport, to learn about instream flow protection to help protect salmon, steelhead and other wildlife. The meeting will be held in the public meeting room at the Central Lincoln PUD building, located at 2129 N Coast Hwy in Newport, across from the Safeway complex.  Refreshments will be served.

Lisa joined WaterWatch as a Staff Attorney in 2004. Lisa’s background includes being a researcher for the aquatic division of the U.S. Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station in Corvallis.  She also worked with Northwest conservation groups on watershed and aquatic habitat protection projects for many years. Lisa’s WaterWatch work has included successfully litigating cases at the Oregon Court of Appeals and the Oregon Supreme Court. These cases pertained to the legal requirement that adequate streamflows are protected for imperiled fish when old municipal water permits are developed. Her talk will provide background on instream flow protection in Oregon and how to improve the state's drought toolbox to protect streamflows and fish.

We hope you can join us on July 7th. 

Monthly Meeting July 2016

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Restoring Native Vegetation to Coastal Watersheds

Thursday July 7th @ 6:30pm

Central Lincoln Peoples Utility District

2129 N Coast Hwy, Newport, OR 97365

David Harris Tillamook Estuaries Partnership

David Harris Tillamook Estuaries Partnership

The public is invited to a talk by David Harris at the MidCoast Watersheds Council meeting on Thursday July 7th, 2016 at 6:30 pm in Newport, to learn about vegetation restoration in our region and the innovative partnership that helps provide native stock. The meeting will be held in the public meeting room at the Central Lincoln PUD building, located at 2129 N Coast Hwy in Newport, across from the Safeway complex.  Refreshments will be served.

David Harris is the Habitat Restoration Project Manager with the Tillamook Estuaries Partnership. He currently oversees the Northwest Oregon Restoration Partnership (NORP). He received a bachelor’s degree in environmental studies from the University of California Santa Barbara in 2004. Following the completion of his formal education David worked for ten years implementing restoration in a variety of habitat types on the Central Coast of California near Santa Barbara. David’s family, originally from Oregon, lured him back to the state and the North Coast. He works closely with the tight-knit restoration community to improve the natural environment we all enjoy. In his free time, David is an avid outdoor enthusiast whose hobbies include fishing, hiking, botany, birding, and mushrooming.

With roots dating back to 2001 with the Tillamook Native Plant Cooperative, the NORP has blossomed to include 35 partners. The primary objective of this group is to promote healthy forest and riparian ecosystem conditions.  It does this by collecting and growing native plant seeds and cuttings to develop genetically adapted, large planting stock that is able to withstand vegetative competition and thrive after planting. It then makes this stock available to implement restoration activities on lands across the North and Mid Coast.

In his talk David will provide background on the objectives and successes of the partnership. He will also lead a discussion with audience members on a range of restoration topics including disease and forest health issues, importance of using regional stock in restoration, climate change and stress on plants, what plants tend to succeed and which tend to fail, and best strategies for dealing with restoring areas with invasive plant species. We hope you can join us on July 7th. 

Monthly Meeting June 2016

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Effects of changing ocean conditions on survival of Oregon's coho and Chinook salmon

Thursday June 2nd @ 6:30pm

Central Lincoln Peoples Utility District

2129 N Coast Hwy, Newport, OR 97365

Bill Peterson, NOAA

Bill Peterson, NOAA

The public is invited to a talk by researcher Bill Peterson at the MidCoast Watersheds Council meeting on Thursday June 2nd, 2016 at 6:30 pm in Newport, to learn about salmon and ocean conditions. The meeting will be held in the public meeting room at the Central Lincoln PUD building, located at 2129 N Coast Hwy in Newport, across from the Safeway complex.  Refreshments will be served.

The Watershed Council is incredibly fortunate to have a speaker this month that has been studying our oceans for over two decades – he brings a wealth of knowledge on oceanic processes into our community on June 2nd.”   

Paul Engelmeyer, Chair of the MCWC

Dr. William (Bill) Peterson is an oceanographer and Senior Scientist with NOAA’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center, based at the Hatfield Marine Science Center. Bill leads the “Climate Change and Ocean Productivity” program. He serves on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Plankton Research and has served as an Editor for Marine Ecology-Progress Series.    He was recently honored by NOAA with a Distinguished Career Award. 

Dr. Peterson’s team has been tracking physical and biological oceanographic conditions off Newport Oregon during oceanographic research cruises.  These cruises have been conducted on a biweekly basis for 21 years.  Information on zooplankton and krill, nutrients, chlorophyll, as well as depth and substrate information are measured.  Having such a long term, continuous data set has allowed the team’s data to now be used to successfully forecast the returns of salmon to the Columbia River and coastal rivers of Oregon and Washington.

 

The species, size and food density of copepods, the tiny crustaceans that are the chief link in the food chain between the microscopic plants (phytoplankton) and fish, can vary greatly during cold versus warm water (e.g. El Niño or “The Blob”) periods in the ocean.  Warm conditions reduce the productivity of the food chain, and negatively affect the survival and growth of many species of fish, seabirds and mammals. Dr. Peterson will discuss the nature of ocean conditions during cold vs warm periods and how this affects the prey that salmon feed on.  He’ll then show how these data are used to provide forecasts on the number of salmon returning to the Columbia River and to coastal rivers of Oregon.  Dr. Peterson will also discuss with the group how climate variability is affecting our salmon now, and how things might change in the near future.

Please join us Thursday, June 2nd at 6:30 PM at the Central Lincoln PUD.

Two OWEB Grants Receive Funding

MidCoast Watersheds Council

At the end of April, we received word from OWEB that our two grants submitted during the October grant season have been approved. We are working closely with OWEB officials and should have grant agreements as soon as the end of this week. Here are the grants:

North Creek Technical Assistance Grant

Civil engineering services are needed to solve the fish passage problem created by the culvert at North Creek and Forest Road 1790 at milepost 5.8. Finding an appropriately priced solution is a complex problem requiring an experienced forest road engineer. The existing 116 foot long pipe, covered by 25 feet of road fill, is found at a bend in the road over exposed basalt bedrock. North Creek has a 24-foot wide bank full width at the Road 1790 crossing. Culvert replacement with a bridge or open bottom arch spanning 36 feet is needed to meet the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) standards found in SLOPES IV. Oregon Coast Coho salmon adults and steelhead trout are known to attempt upstream passage at the site. The culvert stops upstream Fall Chinook salmon adult and juvenile fish migration

Bummer Creek Riparian Planting

Bummer Creek Image.jpg

Bummer Creek (Alsea watershed) has been the target of numerous restoration projects over the past 5 years. It was identified in an OWEB-funded Limiting Factors Analysis (LFA) as temperature and gravel limited. To address these issues, riparian planting, livestock exclusion fencing, culvert replacements and instream large woody debris placements have been implemented on a suite of 8 cooperating small private landowners within the sub-basin. The LFA also classified the lower main stem as highly incised, approximately 12 ft., and limited by truncated linkage to historical off channel rearing habitats. Both the USFWS and the MCWC have been instrumental in the development of salmonid accessible off channel wetland habitat in partnerships on the Parker property as part of this larger basin scale effort. LiDAR analysis has revealed the presence of 1.5 miles of diked and inaccessible oxbow habitat. We propose to extend riparian fencing and planting downstream on Bummer Cr to the next 2 adjacent private land parcels (140 acres combined). This is a private landowner partnership with in kind match contributed from Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQUIP) and Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP). Funds will support the creation of approximately 1500ft of fence to exclude livestock on the Jackson property putting 7.7 acres of land into riparian reserve.

Keep track of our progress on these and other grants by checking on our In Progress projects page

Monthly General Meeting May 2016

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Survival in times of change: Salmon and climate of the Oregon Coast Range

Thursday, May 5th @ 6:30pm

Central Lincoln Peoples Utility District

2129 N Coast Hwy, Newport, OR 97365

rebecca_flitcroft.jpg

The public is invited to a talk by researcher Rebecca Flitcroft at the MidCoast Watersheds Council meeting on Thursday, May 5th, 2016 at 6:30 pm in Newport, to learn about salmon and climate change. The meeting will be held in the public meeting room at the Central Lincoln PUD building, located at 2129 N Coast Hwy in Newport, across from the Safeway complex.  Refreshments will be served.

Dr. Rebecca Flitcroft is a Research Fish Biologist with the USDA Forest Service at the Pacific Northwest Research Station, Oregon, USA.  Her research focuses on aquatic systems from the headwaters to the ocean. She uses both statistical and physical representations of stream networks and estuaries in analysis and monitoring to more realistically represent system complexity and connectivity for aquatic species. In her work, Rebecca has collaborated with federal, state, private and non-profit organizations.

Native aquatic species are adapted to survive in the range of environmental conditions present in their natural habitats. This adaptation reflects past survival and reproduction by members of the population. In the Pacific Northwest, few species have such diverse behaviors as salmonids. This reflects the complexity of their genetic lineage and allows them to survive in remarkably variable and dynamic stream conditions. One questions scientists are asking is how well salmonids will survive under future climates that may affect their habitats from small headwater streams to salty tidal channels. In this talk, Dr. Flitcroft will discuss the development and adaptation of Pacific salmon to Northwest stream environments, and some of the changes we may expect to see in the future.


Please join us Thursday May 5th at 6:30 for this presentation.

Introducing Evan Hayduk

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Evan.jpg

My name is Evan Hayduk. I will be taking over as the Watershed Restoration Specialist with the MidCoast Watersheds Council later this month. I am new to Oregon but have an ingrained sense of Pacific Northwest pride as a lifelong Washingtonian. I recently moved to the state to join my wife, Jen, who is a graduate student at Oregon State University. We currently live in Corvallis, but will be making the move to Lincoln County to be closer to the MCWC office and Jen’s fieldwork on the coast.

I spent most of my childhood outside. My parents set me to work in the family garden from a young age, and I would take every moment to enjoy the outdoors. My first real job was at a retail nursery in high school, and my love for plants and the outdoors continued from there. In college, I focused on environmental issues and policy in my political science degree. Soon afterward I found out that I was much more interested in the "hands-on” side of the restoration world. Since college, I have been committed to environmental restoration and have worked in riparian, wetland, sub-alpine, prairie, forested and oak savanna ecosystems in Washington State. I completed a Master’s in Environmental Studies at The Evergreen State College in 2012, focusing on watershed restoration, hydrology and the use and development of cutting edge data visualization technologies.

In my free time I love to camp, hike and backpack. I’m also a vegetable gardener and avid birder, splitting time between the backyard garden and favorite birding spots. Also, Jen and I both have a travel bug that is constantly calling and have spent time volunteering and traveling in South and Central America.

I am very excited to start work with the MidCoast Watersheds Council. My tasks for the coming year include initiating 4-6 new restoration projects and continue in managing all current projects. However, my first goal is to meet and get to know all of our collaborators. I am here to help, so please don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any questions or ideas about MCWC or the work we do.

Best,

Evan Hayduk

evan@midcoastwatershedscouncil.org