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23 N. Coast Hwy
97365

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News

The latest goings-on at the MidCoast Watersheds Council

June is Orca Month: join us in restoring salmon habitat

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Healthy orcas start with healthy food, and salmon need healthy habitat. That’s why we are partnering to put on not one, but three restoration work parties on Fridays this month: the 7th, 14th, and 21st!

Short descriptions of each event we’re planning follow below, as well as links to more information about them. Please contact ari@midcoastwc.org with any questions.

All Orca Month events listed here.


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June 7th, 10 AM to 3:30 PM: Restoration Work Party at Sitka Springs Farm

Care for a former riparian planting along a salmon-bearing stream by conducting some site preparation and planting at a small organic farm and long-time partner of the Lincoln Soil and Water Conservation District.

More info/directions here.


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June 14th, 9 AM to 12 PM: Beaver Creek Native Plant Nursery Work Party

Volunteers are vital to ensuring locally-adapted plants are available for use in restoration, improving their survival rate and ability to support healthy watersheds, salmon, and everything that relies on these once they are out-planted across the Central Coast. Tasks at the nursery include sowing seeds, starting shrbus from cuttings, potting plants, and weeding.

More info/directions here.


June 21st, 10 AM to 2 PM: Invasive Species Removal in the Salmon River Estuary

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Continue a legacy of restoration by removing invasive species at two important sites. As native plants continue to establish, they must contend with Scotch broom, Himalayan blackberry, English ivy, laurel, fox glove, and other invasive species. Removing these early in the growing season will help ensure young native trees and shrubs are given the best chance to survive so that they may provide habitat benefits for fish and wildlife over the long run.

More info/directions here.