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News

The latest goings-on at the MidCoast Watersheds Council

Monthly Meeting, June 2018

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Restoration BMPs and Oregon’s Native Freshwater Mussels


Thursday June 7th, 2018 6:30 PM 

Newport Visual Arts Center

777 NW Beach Dr. Newport, OR 97365

 Emilie Blevins, The Xerces Society, Endangered Species Conservation Biologist, Freshwater Mussel Lead (Photo Credit: Xerces Society/Michele Blackburn)

Emilie Blevins, The Xerces Society, Endangered Species Conservation Biologist, Freshwater Mussel Lead (Photo Credit: Xerces Society/Michele Blackburn)

 

Freshwater mussels are experiencing a dramatic decline; 72% percent of North American freshwater mussels are considered extinct or imperiled, representing one of the most at-risk groups of animals in the United States. The decline of freshwater mussels is due to a number of factors, including construction of dams, sedimentation, pressure from human populations, stream channelization, dredging, and introduction of exotic species. This has been well studied in eastern North America but has received very little attention in states west of the Rocky Mountains. The MidCoast Watersheds Council invites the public to attend a presentation by Emilie Blevins, on June 7th, 2018 at 6:30 PM in Newport.  The talk will be held in room 205 at the Newport Visual Arts Center at Nye Beach.  Refreshments will be served.

Native freshwater mussels have immense ecological and cultural significance. As filter-feeders, they can substantially improve water quality by filtering out harmful pollutants, which benefits both humans and aquatic ecosystems. Freshwater mussels can benefit native fish by making food more visible and bioavailable to the fish. These animals can be highly sensitive to environmental changes and thus have great potential to be used as indicators of water quality. Freshwater mussels have been historically important sources of food, tools, and other implements for many Native American tribes. Native Americans in the interior Columbia Basin have harvested these animals for at least 10,000 years, and they remain an important cultural heritage for tribes today.

Emilie Blevins, Endangered Species Conservation Biologist and Freshwater Mussel Lead for the Xerces Society will provide an introduction to western freshwater mussel biology and life history, their current status and conservation needs, and introduce freshwater mussel Best Management Practice’s (BMPs) that the Xerces Society and their partners have developed. Emilie earned her MS in Biology from Kansas State University and her professional experience includes more than 10 years working in biological research and conservation. As a conservation biologist with Xerces, Emilie has worked on a number of freshwater mussel projects that include surveying and monitoring, conducting extinction risk assessments, developing and managing the Western Freshwater Mussel database, developing best management practices (BMPs) for freshwater mussels, and conducting outreach to the public, researchers, and agency staff.

Come learn more about the history and future of freshwater mussels on the Oregon Coast on June 7th.

 Western pearlshell in Little Lobster Creek. Emilie will lead a workshop for restoration professionals to this site on June 8th. (Photo Credit: Evan Hayduk)

Western pearlshell in Little Lobster Creek. Emilie will lead a workshop for restoration professionals to this site on June 8th. (Photo Credit: Evan Hayduk)

Monthly Meeting, May 2018

MidCoast Watersheds Council

The Eulachon Story


Thursday May 3rd, 2018 6:30 PM 

Newport Visual Arts Center

777 NW Beach Dr. Newport, OR 97365

 Mac Barr, ODFW, will present current work studying Eulachon populations on the Oregon Coast and beyond. (Photo credit: Mac Barr)

Mac Barr, ODFW, will present current work studying Eulachon populations on the Oregon Coast and beyond. (Photo credit: Mac Barr)

 

Eulachon, commonly called smelt or candlefish are a small, anadromous fish, that like salmon spend 3 to 5 years in saltwater before returning to freshwater to spawn. The name candlefish reflects the fact that they are so fat rich during spawning they could be caught, dried and strung on a wick and burned like a candle.  That also makes them excellent prey for humpbacks, seals, and sea lions and their eggs and larvae important food for salmon and sturgeon. 

Once widespread in coastal streams and nearshore waters, including in places like Yachat’s Smelts Sands Beach, their populations have dwindled in the last few decades.  This decline is of great concern due to their important ecosystem role.   Some wonder if this species be locally extinct in some of our coast streams.

Come learn about what we know about eulachon and the efforts to study and recover their populations when the MidCoast Watersheds Council hosts a presentation by Mac Barr, on May 3rd, 2018 at 6:30 PM in Newport.  The talk will be held in room 205 at the Newport Visual Arts Center at Nye Beach.  Refreshments will be served.

Mac’s presentation will explore the life history as well as the ecological and cultural value of the anadromous forage fish, Eulachon – Thaleichthys pacificus.  He will discuss indications of declining abundance, its listing under the Endangered Species Act and the recently released Conservation and Recovery Plan.  Work that was piloted locally to add LED lights to shrimp trawls to successfully avoid eulachon bycatch will also be mentioned.  Mac will also discuss the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife’s current three-year study attempting to calculate spawning stock biomass in three coastal streams – Cummings, Ten Mile, and Big Creeks.  Unfortunately, to date, the agency has not recovered eggs or larvae in these streams, leading them to believe the local populations may be in trouble.

Following work as a marine educator with the Peace Corps in Samoa, Mac received a Master’s in Marine Resource Management from Oregon State University in 2009.  He then worked as a contract research scientist at the Alaskan Fisheries Science Center with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Seattle where he participated in diet analyses and ground fish surveys of the Bering Sea.  In the fall of 2010, Mac began his career with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife conducting spawning ground surveys for Chinook and Coho salmon.  Eventually, he transitioned to work with the Columbia River Investigation group and participated in stock assessments of White Sturgeon and tagging activities for the Northern Pikeminnow Management Program.  Currently, Mac is the project leader and manager for ODFW’s components of the Northern Pikeminnow Management Program and the project leader for a NOAA Section 6 grant: Studies of Eulachon in Oregon and Washington. 

Come learn more about the history and future of eulachon on the Oregon Coast on May 3rd.

 Pink shrimp bycatch reduction using LED lights: The hopper on the right (No LED’s) shows high bycatch of Eulachon smelt, the hopper on the right (using LED’s) shows much less bycatch.  The use of LED's results in sharp reduction of fish such as smelt, rockfish and flatfish. Findings showed 90% reduction of Eulachon smelt, 78% reduction of juvenile rockfish, 69% reduction of flatfish while having no significant impact on shrimp catch. (Photo Credit: ODFW-  https://www.dfw.state.or.us/mrp/shellfish/commercial/shrimp/LEDs.asp )

Pink shrimp bycatch reduction using LED lights: The hopper on the right (No LED’s) shows high bycatch of Eulachon smelt, the hopper on the right (using LED’s) shows much less bycatch.  The use of LED's results in sharp reduction of fish such as smelt, rockfish and flatfish. Findings showed 90% reduction of Eulachon smelt, 78% reduction of juvenile rockfish, 69% reduction of flatfish while having no significant impact on shrimp catch. (Photo Credit: ODFW- https://www.dfw.state.or.us/mrp/shellfish/commercial/shrimp/LEDs.asp)

Monthly Meeting, February 2018

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Ocean Acidification and Estuaries:

Connections Between Land and Sea


Thursday February 1st, 2018 6:30 PM 

Newport Visual Arts Center

777 NW Beach Dr. Newport, OR 97365

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Dr. George Waldbusser, Associate Professor in the College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University. (Photo: George Waldbusser)

 

Many people hear about ocean acidification (OA) and think about bleaching coral reefs, but what are the effects of OA on our local estuaries? Will our oyster and Dungeness crab fisheries be affected? Is there anything we can do about OA locally?  The MidCoast Watersheds Council invites the public to attend a presentation by Dr. George Waldbusser, on February 1st, 2018 at 6:30 PM in Newport.  The talk will be held in room 205 at the Newport Visual Arts Center at Nye Beach.  Refreshments will be served.

Ocean acidification is the lowering of pH due to the absorption of carbon dioxide.  It is often thought of as an open ocean problem. However, regulators, policy makers, and scientists have realized that ocean acidification also occurs within our nearshore waters and estuaries. The dynamic nature typical of our region’s estuaries, and the fact that they are already often naturally (or unnaturally) enhanced in carbon dioxide has led many to believe increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide does not affect these important habitats. In addition to acidification from atmospheric increases in carbon dioxide, other local and watershed based inputs can also contribute to the acidification of local estuarine waters. In this presentation, George will discuss some of these dynamics and conceptual issues preventing a deeper appreciation of acidification in estuaries, as well as various proposed measures and approaches that can be taken locally to help mitigate this acidification.

Dr. George Waldbusser is an Associate Professor in the College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University with an interest in human-environment interactions. His expertise is in seafloor ecology and biogeochemistry, and he conducts research on the interactions between marine and estuarine biology and chemistry. For the past decade he has been studying ocean acidifications on bivalves, including oysters, mussels, and clams, in Corvallis and the Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport, as well as the US East Coast. He was instrumental in helping to interpret ocean acidification impacts in oyster hatcheries here in the Pacific Northwest, and works on both in basic and applied research questions including strategies for adaptation and mitigation of acidification effects. Dr. Waldbusser has interacted with shellfish growers around the country, and in France, Chile and New Zealand, and was awarded the OSU Vice Provost’s Award for Excellence in Strategic Impact in 2016 for his efforts working with stakeholders. He also serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Shellfish Research and is an Associate Editor at the journals of Limnology and Oceanography: Methods and the Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology.

Come learn more ocean acidification in estuaries on February 1st.

2018 Nature's Coast Calendar

MidCoast Watersheds Council

2018 Nature’s Coast Calendar

Celebrate the beauty of Oregon Coast Wildlife — all year long!

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The Nature's Coast Oregon Wildlife Calendar features more photography than ordinary calendars, with every page a beauty you'll be glad to view all month long. Included are great shots of the following, all of which make their home naturally on the Oregon Coast, with each depicted as beautifully as you've ever seen it before:

Osprey, Bald Eagles, Snowy Owls, Gray Whales, White Pelican, Roosevelt Elk, Harbor Seal Pups, Peregrine Falcons, and Red-wing Blackbirds.

Order a calendar for yourself today — and gift a couple to friends and family!

Proceeds from your purchase will go to the MidCoast Watersheds Council, a non-profit organization dedicated to improving the health of streams and watersheds of Oregon’s central coast so they produce clean water, rebuild healthy salmon populations, and support a healthy ecosystem and economy. The Council works in an area of nearly one million acres, including all streams draining from the crest of the Coast Range to the Pacific, from the Salmon River to Cape Creek at Heceta Head.


***SPECIAL OPPORTUNITY THROUGH THE MIDCOAST WATERSHEDS COUNCIL***

Enter “MCWC” at the time of purchase to receive an additional discount

Monthly Meeting, December 2017

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Sea Level Rise Double Feature: King Tides and Landward Migration Zones


Thursday December 7th, 2017 6:30 PM 

Newport Visual Arts Center

777 NW Beach Dr. Newport, OR 97365

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Regular high tide (left) and a King Tide (right) at Siletz National Wildlife Refuge. (Photo: C. Moffett)

 

If you have been keeping an eye on our local bays and the ocean, you may have noticed some very high tides lately. What do these high, or King Tides, mean for the short term and what could sea level rise mean to the areas of the coast where we live, recreate and enjoy? The MidCoast Watersheds Council invites the public to attend two presentations, by Fawn Custer and Fran Recht, on December 7th, 2017 at 6:30 PM in Newport.  The talks will be held in room 205 at the Newport Visual Arts Center at Nye Beach.  Refreshments will be served.

King Tides- Documenting the Impacts on our Communities with Photos- Fawn Custer- CoastWatch Volunteer Coordinator

Fawn Custer will give a brief introduction to CoastWatch describing the various opportunities for volunteers who love the Oregon Coast to help document changes.  King Tides will be the focus of this talk, and their impact on our shoreline and infrastructure.  Fawn will explain the guidelines for the photos needed to document these events and how best to get involved.

Fawn has taught in both classroom and informal settings for more than 25 years. Her primary teaching focus has always been marine science. Notably, she spent 14 years as an educator at the Hatfield Marine Science Center.  Since 2013, she has been the CoastWatch Volunteer Coordinator, working with over 1,300 amazing volunteers along our coastline and leading tide pool programs for school groups and private parties.

The Impacts of Sea Level Rise on Oregon's Tidal Marshes- Fran Recht- Habitat Program Manager, Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission

Fran’s presentation will describe analyses done under contract to MidCoast Watersheds Council to assess the extent of inundation in Oregon coastal estuaries under different sea level rise scenarios. This includes implications for survival and upslope migration of estuarine marshes.

Fran Recht is the habitat program manager for the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission. Fran Recht is a Depoe Bay resident and one of the founding board members of the MidCoast Watersheds Council.

Come learn more about sea level rise and King Tides on December 7th.

Monthly Meeting, November 2017

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Quantifying the effects of Intensive Forest Management on biodiversity and ecosystem services, with a focus on pollinators


Thursday November 2nd, 2017 6:30 PM

Newport Visual Arts Center

777 NW Beach Dr. Newport, OR 97365

 Matt Betts, professor in Landscape Ecology at Oregon State University, discusses forest management, biodiversity and pollinators. (Photo: Matt Betts)

Matt Betts, professor in Landscape Ecology at Oregon State University, discusses forest management, biodiversity and pollinators. (Photo: Matt Betts)

The Pacific Northwest is one of the world’s most productive timber growing regions, but how do common management techniques affect native wildlife? Join us on November 2nd for a presentation about the how intensive forest management may be affecting pollinators and other native species. The MidCoast Watersheds Council invites the public to attend a presentation by Matt Betts and Urs Kormann, researchers at Oregon State University, on November 2nd, 2017 at 6:30 PM in Newport.  The talk will be held in room 205 at the Newport Visual Arts Center at Nye Beach.  Refreshments will be served.

Intensive forest management (IFM) practices are commonly used to increase timber yield. IFM often applies herbicides to reduce competition from non-crop plants, but the effect of such practices on wildlife in general, and pollinators and their pollination service in particular, have received little attention so far. Addressing this question is timely, given the recent, widespread decline of pollinators worldwide, the so called "pollinator crisis”. In this talk, the speakers will present results from a large-scale experiment in the Oregon Coast range, where they experimentally manipulated the herbicide intensity applied to Douglas Fir stands. They will show how these herbicides affect pollinators and the plants they feed on, and how this translates into plant pollination. Further, the speakers will give a short overview of effects on wildlife in general.

Matt Betts is a professor in Landscape Ecology at the Dept. of Forest Ecosystems and Society, Oregon State University, Corvallis. He studies the ways that forest landscape composition and pattern influence animal behavior, species distributions and ecosystem function. Much of his work is applied and focused on management and conservation, particularly the question of ways of optimizing potential trade-offs between biodiversity and human forest uses. However, understanding mechanisms is key to generalization, so a central part of his research program is basic in nature and links landscape ecology to behavioral ecology, physiology, and evolution. In 2011, he initiated a large experiment looking at the effects of herbicide application on wildlife, yield and ecosystem services in the Pacific Coast Range.

Urs Kormann is originally from Switzerland, now working as a postdoctoral scholar with the forest biodiversity research network at Oregon State University, Corvallis. He has earned a PhD in Ecology in Germany, investigating how tropical deforestation alters bird communities and pollination services of hummingbirds. At OSU, he is now coordinating the "Intensive Forest Management Project", and looking at tradeoffs between herbicide application, pollinators, wildlife and yield. Further, he continues his research on tropical hummingbirds.

Come learn more about pollinators and intensive forest management on November 2nd.

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A native bumblebee (above) and an anise swallowtail butterfly (below) busy at work pollinating along the Oregon Coast. (Photos: Wayne Hoffman) 

NO OCTOBER MCWC MEETING

MidCoast Watersheds Council

No MidCoast Watersheds Council General Meeting, October 2017

We will not be holding a community meeting for the month of October, however we encourage you to attend the following event scheduled for about the same time:

The OSU Hatfield Marine Science Center presents

Science on Tap at Rogue Brewery in Newport’s South Beach

Thursday, October 5, 2017 @ 6pm

The Orphan Tsunami of 1700 - Japanese Clues to Northwest Earthquake Hazards

A talk by Brian Atwater

Dr. Brian Atwater will be the featured speaker at the Hatfield Marine Science Center’s Science on Tap on Thursday, October 5 at 6pm.  

Unusual seas, flooded fields, washed away houses, and a shipwreck occurred in Japan early in the 12th month of the 12th year of the Genroku era. The waves did not attend a Japanese storm, nor were they heralded by a Japanese earthquake. Samurai, merchants, and villagers took notes. Nearly three full centuries later, their writings would be matched with North American sediments and trees to establish that the Cascadia Subduction Zone last produced a giant earthquake and a transpacific tsunami on January 26, 1700. This scientific detective story will be recounted by Brian Atwater, of the U.S. Geological Survey, at the Hatfield Marine Science Center’s Science on Tap on Thursday, October 5 at 6 p.m. 

HMSC’s Science on Tap is at Rogue Ale’s South Beach waterfront location, Brewer’s on the Bay, in the downstairs Board Room. Doors open at 5:15pm, and the presentation will begin at 6pm. The family-friendly event is free and open to the public. Seating is limited and early arrival is recommended. Food and beverage will be available for purchase from the regular menu. 

Monthly Meeting, September 2017

MidCoast Watersheds Council

The Siletz Tribe and Climate Change: Adapting and Monitoring Shifting Coastal Resources

Thursday September 7th, 2017 6:30 PM

Newport Visual Arts Center

777 NW Beach Dr. Newport, OR 97365

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Laura Brown, Shellfish Biologist for the Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Indians

The impacts of climate change are widespread and are expected to affect how coastal resources are managed. Join the MidCoast Watersheds Council on September 7th at 6:30 pm for a presentation by Laura Brown about the how the Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Indians are preparing for these changes. The talk will be held in room 205 at the Newport Visual Arts Center at Nye Beach.  Refreshments will be served.

Laura Brown is the shellfish biologist for the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians in Siletz, Oregon. She received her Bachelor’s in Biology with a minor in Marine Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill, and her MS in Biology from Louisiana State University. Since moving to Oregon in 2012, Laura has conducted research and monitoring efforts from Bandon all the way to Astoria, starting by contracting with the EPA to study nutrient fluxes in the Yaquina Bay. She then moved on to work the Estuary Technical Group monitoring tidal wetland restoration efficacy; more specifically determining how groundwater dynamics, sediment accumulation, channel water salinity and temperature, channel morphology, and plant community composition shift after restoration occurs. Laura’s current position with the Siletz Tribes allows her to represent the Tribes at a variety of marine resource interest meetings, conduct monitoring and research projects on shellfish and climate change, and engage with other organizations who have a common interest in protecting natural resources.

Laura will be talking about the impact of climate change on the Siletz Tribe, and how their group will monitor and adapt to shifts in coastal resources. Part of Laura’s focus has been on restoration of native oyster populations in Yaquina Bay, and she will share information about that project and other work by the tribe. Come learn more about how local groups are adapting to climate change on September 7th.

Dump your hazardous waste for free August 12th in Lincoln County

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Lincoln County residents can properly dispose of highly-hazardous household waste for free during an annual event, sponsored by Lincoln County waste haulers and the County Solid Waste District. Bring your household hazardous waste to North Lincoln Sanitary’s facility at 1726 SE Highway 101, in Lincoln City. They’ll take your hazardous waste without charge from 10am through 3pm on Saturday August 12th.

Held once a year, in partnership with the Lincoln County Haulers, this event rotates between Lincoln City, Newport, Toledo and Waldport. Program Manager, Mark Saelens said “It is critical to do as much as we can to keep hazardous materials out of the environment and away from children and pets. Disposing of old, unused or excess hazardous material is very expensive and this event allows citizens to do their part for free.”

At this event the Household hazardous accepted will include:

• Poisons: pesticides, herbicides, fungicides & other poisons

• Heavy Metals: mercury & products containing elemental mercury

• Corrosives: acids, bases, & reactives

Using care when handling hazardous household waste is essential. The proper preparation and transport of hazardous materials will minimize risks to you, your family, property, and disposal staff from accidental spills or dangerous mixing of materials.

Products should not be mixed together. Dangerous reactions can occur when some materials are mixed. Keeping products in their original containers when possible will help staff dispose of materials safely. Products should also be properly sealed to prevent leaks and spills. If a container is leaking, secure it in a secondary leak-proof container. Pack containers in sturdy boxes in the trunk of your vehicle, away from the driver, passengers and pets.

Containers and boxes, including gasoline cans, cannot be returned, so make sure you don’t need them for future use. Please do not put items in plastic bags.

Household batteries, car batteries and fluorescent bulbs should not be brought to the event as these can be dropped off at recycling/transfer stations throughout the year during regular business hours. Oil based, latex and other paints (some of which are considered hazardous household waste) should not be brought to the event unless the paint cans have lost their label. Most latex and oil based paint can also be dropped off throughout the year. A few spray paint can that are at least a quarter full will be accepted.

CEGs, businesses and governments that have hazardous waste are asked to schedule an appointment to drop off their waste. Fees apply. Please contact Mark Saelens, Lincoln County Solid Waste District (msaelens@co.lincoln.or.us, 541-574-1285) in advance to schedule an appointment.

Monthly Meeting, August 2017

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Monitoring the effects of large wood on stream habitat and salmon populations

Thursday, August 3rd, 2017 6:30 PM

Newport Visual Arts Center

777 NW Beach Dr. Newport, OR 97365

 Chris Lorion (right) works with a technician at the Mill Creek (Siletz) Life Cycle Monitoring site

Chris Lorion (right) works with a technician at the Mill Creek (Siletz) Life Cycle Monitoring site

“How many fish will this restoration project produce?” It is a question restoration professionals get asked all the time, and it is one that is very difficult to answer. However, we may be closer than ever to showing how restoration projects affect fish populations thanks to the Mill Creek (Siletz) restoration and effectiveness monitoring project.

The MidCoast Watersheds Council invites the public to attend a presentation by Chris Lorion, Assistant Project Leader for the Salmonid Life Cycle Monitoring Project with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), on Thursday August 3rd, 2017 at 6:30 PM in Newport.  The talk will be held in room 205 at the Newport Visual Arts Center at Nye Beach.  Refreshments will be served.

The Mill Creek Restoration and Effectiveness Monitoring project was funded by the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board. It is a collaboration between the MidCoast Watersheds Council, ODFW, Oregon State University, Oregon Dept. of Environmental Quality, Weyerhaeuser, Lincoln Soil and Water Conservation District and the Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Indians. The restoration work addressed the limiting factors of stream complexity and winter rearing habitat for coho in Mill Creek.  Over 700 large logs were placed in Mill Creek and its tributaries to capture gravel, aggrade the stream bed, create back eddies and provide protection for young fish.   The effectiveness monitoring part of the project builds on the past work of ODFW in this basin.  Mill Creek is one of seven Salmonid Life Cycle Monitoring (LCM) sites managed by ODFW on the central Oregon coast. These sites estimate abundance of salmonids and downstream migrating juvenile salmonids, estimate marine and freshwater survival rates for coho, and evaluate effects of habitat modification on the abundance of juvenile salmonids. Due to the existing monitoring history, there was the opportunity to evaluate effects of large wood placement on stream habitat and fish populations.

Chris Lorion has worked as the assistant project leader for ODFW for 9 years, coordinating the ODFW Salmonid Life Cycle Monitoring Project. . Before that, Chris earned a Bachelor’s degree in Fisheries Science from Oregon State University and a Doctorate in Natural Resources from the University of Idaho and the Tropical Agricultural Research and Higher Education Center in Costa Rica. Over the past 20 years, Chris has worked on fish research projects investigating a wide variety of species, ranging from lampreys and cutthroat trout in Oregon to cichlids and tetras in tropical streams.

Come learn more about the Mill Creek restoration project and ODFW’s Life Cycle Monitoring on August 3rd!

 Large Woody Debris (LWD) placed in Mill Creek as a part of the restoration project and the effects on stream habitat and salmon populations will be monitored for years to come.

Large Woody Debris (LWD) placed in Mill Creek as a part of the restoration project and the effects on stream habitat and salmon populations will be monitored for years to come.

Coho on Tour- Beaver Creek with Paul Engelmeyer

MidCoast Watersheds Council

You are invited: Beaver Creek tour, led by Paul Engelmeyer

When: June 10, 2017 10am at the Beaver Creek boat launch parking area

 Paul Engelmeyer, Chair of MCWC

Paul Engelmeyer, Chair of MCWC

Paul Engelmeyer, Chair of the MidCoast Watersheds Council and a representative of conservation group interests on the MCWC board of directors, will lead a field trip on behalf of the Native Fish Society.  MCWC participants are invited.

Paul will lead the June 10th field trip starting at Beaver Creek State Park. There Paul will talk about land-based conservation strategies, including conservation easements and landowner driven stewardship in coastal wetlands.

Attendees will learn about the value of alternate life history patterns and how fish hatcheries heavily impacted the diversity of coho salmon. From there participants will head up to the headwater tributaries to gain a vista of current land management issues, including logging and agricultural practices that affect water quality and quantity.

Multiple stops along the way will explain the benefits ofpartnershipsas well as in-stream restoration work completed by local communities in partnership with the Siuslaw National Forest.

On the way back, participants will see what is being done in Oregon's Yaquina estuary to restore juvenile salmon nursery habitats and discuss the planning that is taking place to ensure these habitats persist with sea-level rise.

Paul Engelmeyer, who has been working on coho recovery for over 25 years, will also discuss what still needs to be done to keep Oregon Coastal Coho on the path to broad sense recovery.

Please RSVP and for more information contact:

Paul Engelmeyer, pengelmeyer@peak.org

 Juvenile coho, photo by Conrad Gowell

Juvenile coho, photo by Conrad Gowell

Monthly Meeting, June 2017

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Managing Forest Lands for Multiple Resources

Thursday June 1st, 2017 6:30 PMCentral Lincoln PUD

 Matt Fehrenbacher, Trout Mountain Forestry

Matt Fehrenbacher, Trout Mountain Forestry

See the forest for more than the trees! Join us on June 1st for a presentation on management of Oregon’s coastal forests for multiple benefits.

The MidCoast Watersheds Council invites the public to attend a presentation by Matt Fehrenbacher of Trout Mountain Forestry on June 1st, 2017 at 6:30 PM in Newport.  The talk will be held at the public meeting room at the Central Lincoln PUD, across from the Safeway complex.  Refreshments will be served.

Matt’s presentation will focus on managing forest lands for multiple resources and Trout Mountain Forestry's approach to forest management for various owners including family lands, municipalities and lands owned by conservation organizations.  Matt will discuss the vanEck Forest, a 7,200 acre private forest located in Lincoln county that is managed under a working forest conservation easement.  The easement establishes restoration and maintenance of native forest structure as the primary ecological goal while continuing to generate revenue for the landowner.  Alternative silvicultural approaches such as selective harvest, various thinning regimes, and harvesting to retain trees of variable sizes are being used to encourage complex forest structure while maintaining the capacity for productive commercial forest management.

A native of the rural Willamette Valley, Matt Fehrenbacher has spent the last 20 years in the woods of the Pacific Northwest managing private forests for a broad range of objectives. As a forest engineer and silviculturist for a large industrial timber company in northwest Oregon he implemented some of the earliest salmon habitat restoration projects crafted under the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds. During his ten years as Director of Stewardship at Pacific Forest Trust he was instrumental in development and management of the first forest carbon market project registered under California’s Climate Action Reserve.  He also directed the  stewardship and forest management activities on 20,000 acres of forest conservation lands. Since joining Trout Mountain Forestry in 2011, Matt maintains a client base which includes family forests, non-profit conservation organizations and municipalities. Matt lives in Corvallis with his wife and two daughters.

Come learn more about sustainable forest resource management on June 1st!

People's March for Science Donates Proceeds to Lincoln County School Science Program

MidCoast Watersheds Council

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 Last month, on Earth Day, 675 scientists and community members marched together in Newport to celebrate the importance of science in all our lives.

The march, and subsequent rally, would not have been possible without the support of the participants and the many individuals who contributed to the People’s March for Science.  The donations to the march, supported by the non-profit MidCoast Watersheds Council, were generous and plentiful. 

They covered the march’s costs and more; with $784 of net proceeds.  These funds have been passed on the Oregon Coast STEM Hub in Lincoln County.  The Science, Technology, Engineering and Math program supports students in schools throughout Lincoln County.

Stacia Fletcher, Director of the Oregon Coast STEM Hub, received the donation from the People's March for Science.  Fletcher said, "We're grateful for this donation. This will give us the ability to help Lincoln County students participate in activities such as robotics, renewable energy competitions, and engineering design challenges.”   

The MidCoast Watersheds Council and the march committee thanks everyone for their generosity. 

May 17th: Ocean Frontiers III Film Screening and Panel Discussion

MidCoast Watersheds Council

On May 17 at 5:00pm join us for a special evening at the Yachats Commons for a screening of Green Fire Productions newest film, Ocean Frontiers III: Leaders in Ocean Stewardship & the New Blue Economy. A truly unique and hopeful ocean film that chronicles our efforts to plan for a healthy, safe, and sustainable future, the film explores the intersection of national security, maritime commerce, fishing, and recreation, plus expanding industries such as offshore wind energy and aquaculture, coupled with scientific discovery. The film tells the story of how ocean planning helps us manage and balance all the uses of our ocean to keep it thriving for generations to come.

Ocean Frontiers III Film Screening and Panel Discussion

When: Wednesday, May 17 – Reception 5pm · Film 6pm · Q&A 7pm

Where: Yachats Commons, 441 Highway 101 N., Yachats, OR 97498

Free admission & refreshments

RSVP to save your seat: www.bit.ly/OF3Yachats

Watch the

Facebook Information: https://www.facebook.com/OceanFrontiers/

Participate in the post-film conversation about ocean planning on the West coast with filmmaker, Karen Meyer, Executive Director of Green Fire Productions and Charlie Plybon, Oregon Policy Manager of Surfrider Foundation.

This event is hosted by: Audubon Society of Portland -Ten Mile Creek Sanctuary, Surfrider Foundation, Oregon Shores Conservation Coalition, Midcoast Watersheds Council, and Green Fire Productions.

Event contact: Karen Anspacher-Meyer, Green Fire Productions, Karen@greenfireproductions.org  503-709-5467

Monthly Meeting, May 2017

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Conservation planning for three lampreys of coastal Oregon:  Western Brook Lamprey, Western River Lamprey, and Pacific Lamprey

 Thursday May 4th, 2017 6:30 PM  Central Lincoln PUD

Lamprey species first appear in the fossil record over 450 million years ago. Myth and legend follow these mysterious and secretive fish; you now have an opportunity to learn more and separate myth from reality.

The public is invited to a presentation by Ben Clemens at the MidCoast Watersheds Council meeting on Thursday May 4th, 2017 at 6:30pm, to learn about lamprey on the Oregon coast. The meeting will be held in the public meeting room at the Central Lincoln PUD building, located at 2129 N Coast Hwy in Newport, across from the Safeway complex.  Refreshments will be served.

Ben Clemens is the Statewide Lamprey Coordinator with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. Ben earned his Bachelor’s degree in Biology from Central Michigan University, Master’s degree in Zoology from the University of Guelph, and Doctorate in Fisheries from Oregon State University. Since 2004, Ben has worked on projects related to juvenile Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River estuary, lamprey biology, and led ODFW’s fish ageing laboratory. In his new role as Statewide Lamprey Coordinator, Ben is working on conservation plans for Oregon lampreys, liaising with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on their Pacific Lamprey Conservation Initiative, and is identifying areas needing research, monitoring, and evaluation to help fill information gaps critical to informing conservation planning and actions for Oregon lampreys.

Come learn more about the mysterious lamprey on May 4th!

Monthly Meeting, April 2017

MidCoast Watersheds Council

An Intimate Look at Peregrine Falcon Nesting

Thursday, April 6th, 2017

NEWPORT VISUAL ARTS CENTER

777 NW Beach Dr. Newport, OR

 Wayne Hoffman, Policy Director for the MCWC, aims his camera at a Peregrine Falcon nest at Yaquina Head.

Wayne Hoffman, Policy Director for the MCWC, aims his camera at a Peregrine Falcon nest at Yaquina Head.

PLEASE NOTE THE VENUE CHANGE FOR THIS MONTH

Spring is in the air and you may have noticed the local birds have starting singing in preparation for another nesting season. The public is invited to a presentation by Wayne Hoffman at the MidCoast Watersheds Council meeting on Thursday April 6th, 2017 at 6:30pm, to learn about recent peregrine falcon nesting at Yaquina Head. The meeting will be held in room 205 at the Newport Visual Arts Center, located at 777 NW Beach Dr. in Newport. Refreshments will be served.

Wayne Hoffman is a native Oregonian who graduated from Newport High School in 1969, then obtained Bachelor's and Master's degrees in Zoology from Oregon State University, and a Ph. D in Biology from the University of South Florida.  After a Postdoc with the Kansas Biological Survey he worked for 11 years for the National Audubon Society, conducting research on bird populations and habitat needs.  He then returned to Newport, and has worked for the MidCoast Watersheds Council since 1999, currently as Policy Director. 

A pair of Peregrine Falcons began nesting at Yaquina Head in 2012.  This is the most accessible site in a naturalistic setting for observation and photography in the western United States.  Wayne and other local photographers and birders have been documenting these birds ever since.  Wayne will describe the Peregrine nesting cycle, from courtship to fledgling independence, including incubation, chick feeding behavior, prey selection, and nest defense. He will also illustrate social dynamics, including infidelity, mate replacement, and responses to visitors.

We hope you can join us on April 6th.  

Monthly Meeting, March 2017

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Can we save an estuary ecosystem engineer, the blue mud shrimp, from going extinct?

THURSDAY March 2ND @ 6:30PM

Central Lincoln Peoples Utility District

2129 N Coast Hwy, Newport, OR 97365

 Blue mud shrimp, photo courtesy of Biodiversity of Central Coast (BC), Teegan Bennington

Blue mud shrimp, photo courtesy of Biodiversity of Central Coast (BC), Teegan Bennington

The public is invited to a presentation by John Chapman at the MidCoast Watersheds Council meeting on Thursday March 2nd, 2017 at 6:30 pm in Newport, to learn about the threats to native mud shrimp, the original ecosystem engineer of Oregon estuaries. The meeting will be held in the public meeting room at the Central Lincoln PUD building, located at 2129 N Coast Hwy in Newport, across from the Safeway complex.  Refreshments will be served.

The native blue mud shrimp has been declining to effective or actual extinction over its range between British Columbia and Morro Bay, California. The decline has been due to an introduced Asian isopod parasite that arrived in the mid-1980s without any of its native Asian hosts. The blue mud shrimp has been the only final host for the parasite in Oregon, leaving it without an alternative host to maintain its populations where blue mud shrimp extinctions occur. However, recent invasions of a co-evolved host species from Asia have added an alternative host as the native mud shrimp have disappeared. In the end, the loss of this native mud shrimp will be as significant to the estuaries as diking or the depletion of marshes and mudflats.

John Chapman’s research concerns are the ecology and natural history of introduced marine organisms in nearshore oceans and estuaries, marine tsunami debris, the collapse of native burrowing mud shrimp in the eastern Pacific and the population biology of western gray whale prey species on the Sakhalin Island shelf of Russia. John also teaches “Aquatic Biological Invasions” through the Oregon State University departments of Fisheries and Wildlife and Integrative Biology.

We hope you can join us on March 2nd.  

 John Chapman, OSU Fisheries and Wildlife

John Chapman, OSU Fisheries and Wildlife

Monthly Meeting, February 2017

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Salmon and Floodplains: The National Flood Insurance Program and the Endangered Species Act

THURSDAY February 2nd @ 6:30PM

Central Lincoln Peoples Utility District

2129 N Coast Hwy, Newport, OR 97365

 Matt Spangler

Matt Spangler

This time of year we always seem to be in a flood warning or looking at flooding coming soon. When rivers and creeks spill over their banks people think first about property and possessions, but these floodplains are also important for salmon.

The public is invited to a presentation by Matt Spangler at the MidCoast Watersheds Council meeting on Thursday February 2nd, 2017 at 6:30 pm in Newport, to learn about the National Flood Insurance program and the Endangered Species Act. The meeting will be held in the public meeting room at the Central Lincoln PUD building, located at 2129 N Coast Hwy in Newport, across from the Safeway complex.  Refreshments will be served.

Matt Spangler is the Senior Coastal Policy Analyst for the Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD). Prior to joining DLCD in 2009, he worked for many years as a local government land use planner on the coast, including more than 20 years as the Planning and Development Director for Lincoln County. Matt is a graduate of Whitman College, where he completed a degree in Environmental Studies and Sociology.

Matt’s presentation will provide a summary of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) recent Endangered Species Act Biological Opinion (BiOp) on the National Flood Insurance Program in Oregon.  It will cover the background on the process leading up to the BiOp, how implementation of the recommendations in the BiOp may affect development and management of floodplains in Oregon communities, and the possible implications for salmon recovery. 

We hope you can join us on February 2nd. 

 A common sight this time of year: local creeks spilling over their banks and into floodplains

A common sight this time of year: local creeks spilling over their banks and into floodplains

Monthly Meeting, January 2017

MidCoast Watersheds Council

Newport Surfrider Foundation and the Blue Water Task Force

THURSDAY January 5th @ 6:30PM

Central Lincoln Peoples Utility District

2129 N Coast Hwy, Newport, OR 97365

  Vince Pappalardo testing water quality on the beach near Newport.

Vince Pappalardo testing water quality on the beach near Newport.

Do you like to roll up your pants and hike the beach?  It’s best to know if there are any water quality issues at your favorite spots – here is a project that will help you understand the health of our beaches and nearshore waters.

The public is invited to a presentation by Vince Pappalardo at the MidCoast Watersheds Council meeting on Thursday January 5th, 2017 at 6:30 pm in Newport, to learn about the Newport chapter of the Surfrider Foundation and their Blue Water Task Force. The meeting will be held in the public meeting room at the Central Lincoln PUD building, located at 2129 N Coast Hwy in Newport, across from the Safeway complex.  Refreshments will be served.

Vince Pappalardo holds a Bachelor’s of Science in Mechanical Engineering from San Jose State University and has been a professional Mechanical Engineer for the last 29 years. However, his passion is surfing and he has a deep love of the ocean. To support his passion, Vince has been an active member of the Newport Surfrider Chapter for the last 10 years. In that time, he has served as the Beach Cleanup Coordinator, Blue Water Task Force Coordinator and now holds the position of Volunteer Coordinator.

Vince’s presentation will focus on the work done by the Newport Surfrider Foundation testing local water quality, cleaning up beaches and shaping local marine policy.  There will be an emphasis on the water quality testing work in terms of what is tested, where tests are done, and the current state of water quality at the 5 to 10 sites tested weekly.

 Come learn more about the water quality at your favorite beach spots!

Come learn more about the water quality at your favorite beach spots!

We hope you can join us on January 5th.